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French Open Betting

Roland Garros French Open Logo

The French Open is the second of the four tennis Grand Slam events that are played throughout the course of the season. The French Open, or “Roland Garros” as it is commonly known as is preceded by the Australian Open and followed by Wimbledon. It is the only Grand Slam played on clay. This is a tournament which is played in the Spring and is contested over two weeks in late May and early June.

The challenge of clay, which produces a slower pace and higher bounce off the surface than the grass and hard courts, makes it arguably the toughest of the four Grand Slam events to be won. As there is no tie-break in the final set either is can also combine to be one of the most arduous tests of endurance as well.

Former Winners

The tournament has a rich history and the tournament started back in 1891 and only players who were current members of French tennis clubs could take part. It was a Brit who actually won the first edition though, H. Briggs as he was a member of a French club. 1897 saw the first women’s edition being played, with the mixed doubles and the women’s doubles getting added on in later years. 1925 saw the shift from only allowing members from French clubs being allowed to play at the tournament. All international amateurs were allowed into the event that year.

Men’s’ Singles Winners

The winner of the men’s tournament gets The Four Musketeers Cup. That’s nothing to do with the famous novel by Alexandre Dumas, instead it’s named after four famous French tennis players Jean Borotra, Jacques Brugnon, Henri Cochet and Rene Lacoste. Following that inaugural season, every edition right through to 1932 was won by a French player.

The tournament switched to being known as the French Open in 1968 (the Open era) and Ken Rosewall of Australia was the first winner there. Legend Bjorn Borg won it back to back in 1974 and 1975 and then between 1978 and 1981 he won it four times on the bounce. Other greats like Ivan Lendl, Jim Courier and Andre Agassi would all win the Grand Slam title in Paris. You can’t of course talk about French Open winners without mentioning the greatest of them all, Rafael Nadal. His era started in 2005 when the clay court master won it for the first time against Mariano Puerta. Nadal won the next three editions as well and after not getting the 2009 title, he struck back to win the next five editions straight. The Spaniard’s 2017 triumph over Stan Wawrinka was his tenth title at the French Open making him the most successful player ever in the history of the tournament.

Women’s’ Singles Winners

The inaugural Women’s edition was won by Adine Masson in 1897 and she would win the following two editions as well. Through to 1936, there were only French winners of the tournament, including legend Suzanne Lenglen. The first British winner of the women’s event was Margaret Scriven Vivien in 1933. It was the USA’s Nancy Richards who won the first ever edition in the Open era in 1968 and then some legends of the game were scrapping it out for supremacy, namely the likes of Margaret Court, Billie Jean King and Chris Evert, the latter winning seven French Open’s over a 13-year span. Other notable multiple-time winners of the French Open include Belgium’s Justine Henin who got the title four times, Monica Seles who won it for three straight seasons between 1990 and 1992 and Serena Williams of course. Along with Chris Evert’s seven titles, Germany’s Steffi Graf is regarded as one of the greatest French Open players with six titles between 1987 and 1999 inclusive in Paris.

Tennis Betting – Odds, Preview and Predictions

2019 French Open Review

The big story of the 2019 French Open was Rafael Nadal extending his record of titles at the tournament. Not only did the Spaniard manage to defend his title, but he claimed it for an astonishing 12th time in his career.

Nadal only dropped the one set in the first four rounds of action at Roland Garros in 2019 as he set about defending his title.

Nadal didn’t drop a set either in his quarter-final success against Kei Nishikori or during his semi-final breeze against old rival Roger Federer.

Opposing Nadal in the final of the 2019 French Open was Austria’s Dominic Thiem and it was a repeat of the 2018 Final in which he lost in straight sets to Nadal. Thiem had already pulled off an epic win in the semi-finals against Novak Djokovic in five sets.

Could he do better in the final against Nadal this time around in what was his second Grand Slam final? Well, Thiem did at least manage to get a set on the board in the 2019 Final against the Spaniard, but fell to a 3-1 defeat, Nadal winning the third and fourth sets by a 6-1 score.

Barty makes Slam breakthrough

Simona Halep was the defending Women’s champion but she took a bow in the quarter-finals in an upset against the unseeded American youngster Amanda Anisimova.

Ashleigh Barty benefitted from that as the Australian went on to beat Anisimova in the semi-finals.

In the other semi-final, Britain’s Johanna Konta was chasing down her first-ever Grand Slam final. But she came up short in a narrow straight-sets defeat against the united Marketa Vondrousova, which was a huge missed opportunity for the Brit.

In the 2019 French Open Women’s Final, Barty raced to a straight-sets victory, dropping just the four games against Vondrousova.

2020 French Open Preview

Because of the 2020 outbreak of the coronavirus Covid-19 a decision was made to postpone the 2020 French Open until later in the year. The tournament was originally booked for a start of May 24th and to conclude on June 7th.

However, the pandemic has seen the tournament move to the Autumn to run from September 20th through to October 4th.

For the 2020 French Open, it will be Rafael Nadal and Ashleigh Barty who will be defending their singles titles.

For Nadal he is eyeing up an astonishing 13th French Open title and a fourth consecutive one.

Ashleigh Barty will be returning to the scene of her Grand Slam breakthrough, having collected the title in 2019 at Roland Garros.

The 2020 French Open will be the first time that the tournament will be played with a retractable roof.

All four show courts at the event have had floodlights installed so bad light will not be able to stop play any more.

With changes to the other Slams, the French Open is now the only Grand Slam tournament that retains the advantage set (a set won by a player by a two-game advantage having won at least six games) while the other Slams have a tiebreak to settle the deciding set.

You can find betting odds, previews and predictions about upcoming Tennis fixtures at the Australian Open in our news category Tennis Betting: